Video: Direct link between Advance Steel and BIM – Review from AceCAD


GRAITEC and AceCAD offer a direct link so that a 3D model done in Advance Steel can be successfully imported in BIMReview and then StruMIS.
This movie demonstrates how users may take advantage of this link by exporting the Advance Steel model to a *.gtcx file format and how this fully detailed model is imported and can be viewed & manipulated like any other BIMReview model.
As you can see with this movie, GRAITEC Advance Steel is fully BIM compliant allowing easy and seamless data sharing with BIMReview for easy project collaboration.

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Advance Steel – Stairs and Railings review by CAD Digest Magazine


Advance Steel offers an extensive library of smart objects, automatic joints and specific tools for creating not only standard structures, but also stairs, railing and miscellaneous steel work. CAD Digest, one of the most popular online sources for CAD, CAM & CAE articles and testimonials, reviews the ADVANCE Steel – Stairs and Railings feature set.

For this review, the author created two sets of stairs, one straight andone spiral, describing each step of the process – drawing, editing stairs properties, adding, removing or modifying landings or handrails – highlighting the efficiency and ease-of-use of the software: “I was impressed with how easily Advance Steel creates stairs to my specification, and the ease with which I could modify their properties, along with associated components.

With Advance Steel, it is easy to create, modify and customize all types of stairs, landingsand railings. Using the software’s advanced tools, with a few clicks defining the height, the tread width and the direction, the entire stair can be created.

Other benefits of the stairs and railing feature of Advance Steel include the large library of predefined objects and the automatic creation of all necessary documents (including NC files). “GRAITEC includes a large library of stair tread types, and I had the option to define my own types and save them as templates for future use. I recommend anyone looking for an efficient way to design and document miscellaneous steel projects to consider GRAITEC’s Advance Steel Software.

Read the full article here

ADVANCE Steel 2013 reviewed by AEC Magazine


AEC Magazine

AEC Mag.com is the online presence of AEC Magazine, UK’s number 1 journal for decision makers in Architecture, Engineering and Construction. AEC Magazine has a bold agenda that reflects the evolutionary nature of this fast-moving sector with its proliferation of software and hardware technologies and the collaborative working practices that are integral to today’s design and engineering workflow.

Greg Corke, Managing Editor for AEC Magazine, offers a first look at GRAITECs first release for this year: ADVANCE Steel 2013. For version 2013, the software remains focused on quality and enhanced efficiency: “Having done a major re-write last year, the 2013 release is about improving user productivity. GRAITEC has focused on four main areas — user interface, raw performance, modeling enhancements and drawing issue and re-issue.

Advance Steel 2013 reviewed by AEC Magazine

The start page is new, offering users a quick look at recent projects, videos, tutorials, FAQs and others. For the interface however, the biggest change is found in the tool palette, from which many of the model manipulation commands are found. In terms of performance, the graphic engine has been optimized, new viewing modes are available and the general speed has been improved. “GRAITEC has placed a big emphasis on performance and 64-bit support means there are now no limitations on model size, providing the workstation has enough system memory.

The modeling process has been improved thanks to new intelligent tools made ​​available to users. This reflects directly to the production and quality of the drawings, which are now “less manual”on the way these are updated or referenced.

While the performance improvements will no doubt be welcomed with open arms, it is the workflow enhancements that will arguably have the biggest impact — particularly when it comes to minimizing the amount of manual re-work required on re-issued drawings”, Greg Corke concluded.

Click here to read the full review